FULCHINO VINEYARD

Producing Fine Tasting Wines... God's Gift made from
Sunlight, Earth, Vine, and Tradition.

 

Winery Hours
Starting April 1, Open Seven days per Week
11:00AM-5:00 PM
Closed Easter and Fourth of July!!!
**
Call (603) 438.5984 for additional
dates & times, if you're in the area.


Also, our wines are available at Harvest Market in Hollis & Bedford,
Ayotte's in Hudson, The Beer Store NH on Rt 101 in Nashua and
at the Ingenuity Country Store in Keene, the
, Walpole Grocery in Walpole,
Mckinnon's in Salem and also Portsmouth!



 

The Wines
(see labels below)

SIGNATURE BLENDS

Cenare
Mirabella
Vivace
Celebrativo
La Famiglia
~and~
REDS
Avellino
Barbera

Campagna

Classico
Hollis Vino
La Grein
Montepulciano
Provence

Sangiovese
Tutto di Rossi
Vivere

Zinfandel


WHITES
Biancco
Frontenac Gris
La Vita
La Dolce Vita

La Prima Frutta
Sole Mio

Dessert Wines
SETA
Peach Vino
Strawberry

and several more...

The Vineyard
A family tradition has
made its way into your hands.

Our Signature Blends
Cenare, Mirabella and Vivace
' Blends of bold taste and smooth mouth feel'


A special blend of grapes have come together. These wines will cellar easily for several or more years. And as they age, the complexity of tastes and aromas will come more to the forefront and grow in intensity. This is a call to make sure you put some aside for your future enjoyment!. These blends are something that I have worked on for quite some time and are probably unlike anything most people have ever tasted. Whether poured straight from the bottle or decanted, the taste and aroma is unbelievable.Silky, velvetyand vanilla smooth is the Mirabella, bright, lively and spiritedis the Vivace and the king, our Cenare, is meant for all the important times in your life, your dinners, both big and small, from the very intimate dinner to your most formal banquet. The flavors are all full ofspices, sweet black cherries, currants, a hint of chocolate and even orange peel.Notes of leather and dried fruits just explode and cover the entire mouth. Even without aging these wines achieve a unique ability .These are all meant to be a ‘before dinner wine’, ‘a during dinner wine’ and yet still be wonderful asan ‘after dinner wine'.

They will have no restrictions! Pare them with all kinds of foods or enjoy them alone. And that makes theses wine a ‘food’ all by themselves, and more attractive to more types of people and their tastes. You may laugh, but I like to sip them through the day.

- Al Fulchino


Production will be limited to a set number of cases each year. You may wish to reserve yours today. Everything is done by hand, including the bottling, corking and labeling, the intent was to make a wine that everyone would really enjoy, especially those who are not naturally wine drinkers and have been turned off by typical wines.


Terroir, a French word sometime described as the sum of all the environmental factors that influence a given vineyard site.Some examples are amount of sunshine, soil type, altitude, amount of rain, fog, and wind that affect the quality of the finished wine like altitude, position relative to the sun, angle of incline, and water drainage. Other definitions of terroir connote a "sense of place" in the terroir. And this could never be more applicable than here in our Fulchino Vineyard located in Hollis, New Hampshire, where we couple our love of sun, soil and vines with hostory. atmosphere, tradition, hard work and joy. In fact, "sense of place" truly captures the essence of our vineyard.

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The 2010 Growing Season in Progress

We believe in letting the vine and its fruit express itself. We are translators for what has already been created. Our joy is in seeing others enjoy our wine as a food, a medicine as Hippocrates said, and to enjoy it with their families and friends. Much is said of terroir and what the earth contributes to a wine but we can add something more... intangibles... While nearby cities to our south, east and north bustle with activity, a timeless feeling engulfs the atmosphere hovering over and around the vines. A timeless quality exists here that brings us all back to another time seemingly gone by. Here hustle and bustle no longer matter and traditions that go back in our family for centuries have resurfaced.Annually we work to harness the wild portion of the terrior, the planting of new generations of vines, the yearly pruning, cultivating and ultimately the harvesting of the fruit of the vine. To our north, family farmers can be seen toiling away bringing fresh food to local markets and tourists, and the occasional sounds of young children playing escape the confines of the treetops. To our immediate east it is common to see young foals coming into the world and learning to walk and soon are outrunning their parents...to our south are wetlands that provide safety and rest to white tail deer, wild turkeys, small game and the occasional bear or coyote that tracks its prey. With an eye up to the sky one will see circling hawks, wild geese, ducks and the occasional passenger jet that takes its passenger to places here and there in a hurry... passing over this place of silence..of peace..of simple beauty where two or more people can decide to not rush around, but to sit face to face with another and just talk with each other and observe the many nests that momma and pappa birds have decided to construct in our trellis to lay eggs and raise their young and occasionally you will see on the ground a nest filled with eggs and a mother killdeer trying to lead you awat from it. In front of us, as we gaze thru the vineyard rows, yellow finches and robust cardinals are among the many species of birds that flit to and fro and rest on the many trellis wires for a rest or to use as a launching pad to pluck earthworms from the healthy and deeply organic soil below.

 

The soil itself is a bit of a rich story in and of itself. Two feet deep in places of rich organic matter virtually devoid of anything else such as sand, clay or rocks reaches depths of up to a full two feet (somewhat uncommon in the six state region of New England) until we reach a seeming endless coarse sand that houses a year round high water table that feed the vines naturally. We do no irrigation of our established vines.The topsoil itself is rich in minerals and nutrients, a natural home to the vines and it holds rainwater for a time until ultimately and begrudgingly it releases it to the sands below where the roots of the vine chase the moisture. These sands lay to depth of another 50 feet or more are a natural occurrence in southern New Hampshire. And all of this rests on the foundation of our region. Granite. Hence the name the Granite State.Our granite over time yields to the pressures of the earth and fragment and ever so slowly release their own minerals upward into the sand, where they wait for the roots of the vines to find them.


Bringing the Tradition to You
Newly Planted in 2007
More Vines Planted in 2008

Located at the lowest point in Hollis' Pine Hill Valley our level vineyard is a quiet place, yet active with contradictions.It is peaceful yet full of natures tugs and pulls. The terroir says to this next generation 'come visit with me..come .work with me...come harvest me, together we can yield for you wine as a drink...wine as a food...and wine as a medicine in this most unexpected of places'.The teroir says to us 'that things will not be easy but with hard work I will yield to you if you respect what I have to offer'

 

 

Fulchino Vineyard on Facebook

 

 

"The bronze skin of our Frontenac Gris grapes is a vital component that lends color to the juice, resulting in a wine with rich amber color, The wine presents aromas of coconut, pineapple, peach and apricot with hints of enticing citrus and tropical fruit. A brilliant balance of fruit and acidity creates a delightful refreshing wine. Frontenac Gris, an excellent choice for seafood, chicken and lighter dinner fare."ebook

Stop by and experience the fruits of a tradition handed down through the generations and enjoy a Fulchino Vineyard Signature Blend Moment.

Additional wines coming soon...

Visit our Hollis, NH location
- Al Fulchino

Winemaker & Viticulturist
(Produttore di Vino) & (Viticoltore

We hope that when you decide to sit down and open one of our Fulchino Vineyard Wines, you will feel and experience what went into your wine, because it contains our land, our sunlight, our painstaking devotion. You are drinking our terroir. Enjoy!


Some More of our Wines

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Now

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Now

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Now

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Now

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Now

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Now

2009 Vintage Sold Out - 2010 Vintage Available Soon

2010 Vintage Available Now

2010 Vintage Available Now

2010 Vintage Available Now

2010 Vintage Available Now

 

Fresh Strawberries and Peaches
from Lavoie's Farm on Nartoff Rd, Hollis

(pictured John Lavoie)



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A Note to you: We have been asked many times to submit our wines to contests...long ago, however we recognized that it is only you who can decide if you will enjoy our wines. One smile from you after tasting our wines is the same as a gold medal to me. In fact it is often noted that wine judges are like movie reviewers..one says good and one says bad, yet its the very same movie. A detailed study was perfomed and recently published
that in point of fact that expands on this....you will see the article below.....
it is YOU that we are choosing to share our wine with so,


....'bevande a vino' and 'fidarsi e bene, non fidarsi è meglio' together this means 'drink some wine' and 'above all, trust only yourself, no one else!'

The article below does not imply or suggest we believe a wine judge cannot have something constructive to share...instead, it is our recognition that you are the only judges matter to us.

How Reliable are Wine Judges? Not at all!
January 27, 2009, by Karl Storchmann (Journal of Wine Economics)


“The California State Fair Commercial Wine Competition is the oldest and most prestigious wine competition in North America and is open to California bonded wineries selling retail. Each year, thousands of California wines are entered into the competition for the chance to win one of many coveted awards, such as the Best of Show Red, Best of Show White, and Best Value Wine from the State Fair’s panel of expert wine judges. For over 150 years, the California State Fair has recognized the best wines of the state and the dedication of wineries and vintners in the Golden State’s viticulture and enology industry. Award winners truly are the best of the best!”

This is the introduction on the website of the California State Wine Fair. It goes on as follows. “In 2008, a remarkable 649 wineries entered 2,917 wines into the annual judging contest. The winners are determined by the distinguished panels of judges which come from a wide range of diverse backgrounds and are reviewed before they are permitted to evaluate the wines.”

How reliable are these judges? Robert T. Hodgson examined this and his analysis, entitled “An Examination of Judge Reliability at a major U.S. Wine Competition,” is published as the lead article in the new issue of the Journal of Wine Economics (JWE, Vol 3, No 2). We made the article public and it can be accessed on our website (click here). A nice report was published in Wines & Vines today.

In the spring of 2003 the author contacted the chief judge of the California State Fair wine competition in Sacramento, proposing an independent analysis of the reliability of its judges. The following questions were asked. Why is it that a particular wine wins a Gold medal at one competition and fails to win any award at another? Is this caused by bottle-to-bottle variability of the wine? To what extent is the variability caused by differing opinions within a panel of judges? Finally, could the variability be caused by inability of individual judges to reproduce their scores?”

Between 2005 and 2007, Hodgson conducted the following experiment. Each panel of four expert judges received a flight of 30 wines which included triplicates poured from the same bottle. Between 65 and 70 judges were tested each year. Judges were asked to provide letter scores for each wine, i.e., Bronze, Bronze+, Silver-, etc. Letter scores were later converted to numerical scores ranging from 80 points (No Award) to 100 points.

The following graph shows the deviations for identical wines. Look at the line entitles “maximum range”. The median judge (at the 50% line) in 2005 deviates by as much as 10 points. This equals a range from Silver- to No Medal. In fact, only 10% of all judges can replicate their assessment within one medal rank, i.e., 90% cannot.

 


Cumulative Frequency Distribution for Range and Maximum Range 2005-2008

Scatter diagram of pooled standard deviation for the 26 judges who participated in 2005 and 2006 Correlation = -0.01



But that is not all. Even the reliable judges are not reliable over time. The best judges in 2005 were not the best in 2006. Hodgson provides the following scatterplot showing the deviations in 2005 and in 2006. One would expect that a small deviation correlates with a small deviation in 2006. But that is not the case. In fact, the correlation between performance in these two years is r=-0.01, i.e., not existent.

This is fairly amazing and shows us that the Wine Competition Results are seriously flawed.

Readers of the Journal of Wine Economics will recall Orley Ashenfelter’s very entertaining interview with Bruce Kaiser entitled “Tales from the Crypt: Auctioneer Bruce Kaiser Tells Us about the Trials and Tribulations of a Wine Judge” , where he reports about his experience of being a California State Wine fair judge. Having read this, Robert Hodgson’s results seem little surprising.

However, it is surprising that the California State Wine Fair Board lets us publish Hodgson findings. Clear-cut, they are seriously interested in solving rather than concealing the problem which is a very productive attitude (and hard to find nowadays). They might get rewarded and end up with new ways how to conduct the wine competition; maybe have a more reliable wine assessment than others. After all, the judge-reliability problem is not confined to the California State Wine Fair. We face this almost everywhere. Hodgson is already working on statistical ways to mitigate the issue.

source:http://wine-econ.org/2009/01/27/eeee.aspx

American Association of Wine Economists AAWE
Wine and Food Economics Blog

Distributors Contact: FULCHINO VINEYARD
187 Pine Hill Road
Hollis NH 03049
Phone: 603.438.5984 & 603.438.5107

E mail: FulchinoVineyard@Charter.net - Join Our Mailing List


God Bless America,
and the Men and Women who Defend Her!



image: our flowers, our grapes, a destination for our winetable